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By | Paul Kunert 7th July 2016 22:54

Cisco UK and Ireland boss Phil Smith quits

Makes way for Scot Gardner, takes brief stroll to chairman's office

Exclusive Cisco's long-serving UK and Ireland overlord Phil Smith has called time on his reign after more than two decades at the wheel.

Back in 1994, when the exec rocked up at Switchzilla, Forest Gump was running on the big screen, Sony had launched the PlayStation, and wisecracking imps Ant and Dec, then known as PJ & Duncan, were getting ready to rumble.

Smith wrote a memo to staff today confirming that he is heading upstairs to the chairman's office, and Scot Gardner, currently EMEAR veep of the service provider business, will be his successor, insiders told us.

According to Companies House, Cisco UK turned over £14.2m and made a net loss of circa £225,000 in the year ended July 1994. By fiscal '14, net profit was £3.6m on sales of £399.26m, and paid out a dividend of £90m.

"He had a good stretch," a source said.

Smith is also chairman of the Technology Strategy Board and e-Skills UK, so it is likely the exec will split his time between these and Cisco.

Cisco was unavailable for comment at the time of writing.

Updated

Cisco's Smith has confirmed in a blog he is leaving the role, having "reached an important juncture in my career," and that he'll be making the transition to the role of Chair of Cisco UK and Ireland on a part-time basis".®

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