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By | Chris Mellor 3rd December 2012 15:33

EMC mixes database upstart into its Greenplum pudding

Allow more users to run queries simultaneously? Now there's an idea

EMC has snapped up Israeli database control and monitoring software MoreVRP, and will integrate it into its Greenplum big data offering.

The product was developed by privately held More IT Resources, and EMC has bought the company for an undisclosed amount.

More IT Resources was founded in 2006 and VRP stands for Virtual Resource Partitioning software. The startup reckons its software offers a "unique approach to IT performance" by "managing resource allocation in real-time at the OS transaction level".

It uses a form of database virtualisation and integrates with products by EMC-owned VMware. According to time More IT Resources:

MoreVRP for Greenplum not only allows you to see the aggregative view of performance among the entire server’s cluster or appliance, it will also allow you to drill down into specific database segments and query slices and identify performance anomalies and skew problems.

You can leverage the VRP engine within MoreVRP to dramatically increase the system’s concurrency by allowing more users to run queries simultaneously and shift resources dynamically between the various consumers based on your business needs and by that guaranteeing superior QoS and SLA to your business.

Israeli business website Globes says it is EMC's seventh Israeli acquisition and the price is likely to be in the $10m to $20m range. ®

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