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By | Paul Kunert 7th March 2012 13:47

Microsoft stumps up titsup Azure cloud compo

Credit dished out to make up for leap day bug

Microsoft has confirmed to El Reg that it will cough up service credits for customers walloped by the recent Azure outage.

Under its T&Cs, Redmond offers financially backed service level agreements (SLAs) covering its cloud portfolio, and previously dished out credit notes to BPOS users for a seven-hour blackout in the summer.

The Azure platform went down for more than nine hours last week thanks to a software bug; although the final "root cause analysis" is progressing, a time calculation that tripped up on February's leap day appears to be at fault, Microsoft said.

Customers of Azure Compute and Content Delivery Network (CDN) availability services can expect a 10 per cent credit note for uptime lower than 99.95 per cent availability and 25 per cent for anything below 99 per cent in a month.

The SLAs for Azure Storage, SQL Azure, Access Control, Caching or Service Bus commit to a 10 per cent credit note when uptime falls below 99.9 per cent availability and 25 per cent in instances lower than 99 per cent.

In a brief statement Microsoft said: “We will compensate customers for the outage based on existing Service Level Agreements.”

The software giant, gearing up for its Windows 8 launch, added it will confirm the reasons for the outage within the next couple of days. ®

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