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By | Paul Kunert 16th November 2011 12:39

Two bosses axed in Azlan makeover

Enterprise distie cuddles up to vendors

Azlan made two senior managers redundant as part of a planned restructure.

The enterprise wing of Computer 2000 is moving from a structure based on vertical markets to one that is based on vendor partners. An HP, IBM and Cisco division will be put in place as a starting point.

As a result, unified comms marketing director Simon Welch and Mark Walker, director of the converged infrastructure unit, are leaving the firm.

Andy Gass, UK managing director at C2000, refused to comment on any personnel changes, but said: "Our organisational restructure is designed to align us more closely to work with key manufacturers."

He made no further comment.

The changes follow the arrival some months ago of former Bell Microproducts director Colin McGregor to run Azlan, who now appears to be making his own mark on the business.

Azlan's restructure is similar to the shape adopted by enterprise infrastructure distributors Avnet Technology Solutions and Arrow Electronics, which leads to vendors believing their relationship with a distie is more strategic.

On top of the vendor units, Azlan is also understood to be assembling a standalone services unit and an enterprise networking and security division to seed relatively smaller but growing manufacturers. ®

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