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By | Guardian Government Computing 6th April 2011 10:17

Buying Solutions launches office supply framework

Computer supplies and hardware included in wide-ranging tender document

Buying Solutions has tendered for the first of its nine frameworks designed to provide a centralised procurement model.

A tender document from the government's chief procurement agency says that the framework, worth between £240m and £400m over four years, is aimed at transforming how it buys common goods and services. It wants to make more use of centralised category management, standardised specifications and aggregated spending.

The products listed in the tender document include computer hardware, toner and ink cartridges, magnetic disc storage units, library automation equipment, continuous paper for computer printers and "computer supplies".

Other products include a broader range of office supplies.

The new model involves a governance structure to make key decisions on procurement for central government, supported by category management teams. It will be implemented across nine spending categories, of which office solutions is one.

This article was originally published at Guardian Government Computing.

Guardian Government Computing is a business division of Guardian Professional, and covers the latest news and analysis of public sector technology. For updates on public sector IT, join the Government Computing Network here.

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