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By | Kelly Fiveash 17th December 2010 14:41

MPs set out on quest to find's IT strategy

Also plan to go unicorn spotting

The government's technology strategy is being scrutinised by the Common's Public Administration Select Committee (PASC).

The committee said it would look at how the government develops and implements its IT policy.

"The inquiry will examine the government’s overall strategy for information technology, including how it identifies business needs, the effectiveness of governance arrangements, and procurement policy and practice," it said.

Evidence sessions will kick off in the New Year, said the committee, and in the the meantime it is inviting written evidence on issues relating to the inquiry.

In effect, the committee will spotlight the government's procurement policy and behaviour. It will also consider how Whitehall determines its technology business requirements.

"Central government is notorious for large IT projects running over time, over budget and ultimately failing," said the committee.

Cabinet Office minister Francis Maude said last month that IT contracts agreed upon in Whitehall should be clearer.

"There are competitive processes, but actually the way we do procurement is often excluding smaller suppliers from the process. Very costly, very over-engineered and it isn't the open competition that we want to see that really does drive value and drives innovation," he said at the time. ®

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