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By | Cade Metz 18th November 2010 18:50

Google Apps offer 'full spectrum' of Google services

You get it all. Except extra phone support

Google is now allowing businesses, government agencies, schools, and other organizations to use more than 60 existing Google services from their Google Apps accounts. In May, Google announced that such a move was on the way.

"We’re thrilled to swing the floodgates of new functionality wide open," the company said in a Thursday morning blog post. "Customers worldwide can access a full spectrum of services from Google."

The list of available apps includes Google Voice, Reader, Blogger, and AdWords.

Existing Google Apps customers can move to the new infrastructure that drives the added selection of services "at their own pace," but all new customers will automatically be put on the new infrastructure. The rub is that added services are not covered by Google's SLA or telephone support. The company has said in the past that it will "evaluate future support problems."

As part of the change, Google has also rejigged the names of its various Google Apps services. Google Apps is the free service for outfits of up to 50 users. At $50 per user per year, Google Apps for Business offers 25GB of email storage per user, a guarantee that the service will be available 99.9% of the time; an added selection of data migration, management, and security tools; and telephone support. Google Apps for Government offers FISMA (Federal Information Security Management Act) certification and other stuff meant to appeal to government types. And Google Apps for Education offers something similar to Google Apps for Business, but it's free to to schools, universities, and some non-profits. ®

Update

Google now tells us that the added services are not available with Google Apps for Government.

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