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By | John Oates 17th November 2010 09:27

DiData stares down the recession

Sales, profits up

Dimension Data grew revenue by 19.4 per cent in 2010, although this was flattered by moves in its main currencies - especially the South African Rand and the Aussie dollar.

Stripping out currency moves, the reseller still grew sales by 9.9 per cent and margins were up from 4.9 per cent to 5 per cent. Revenue for the year ended 30 September 2010 was $4.74bn.

Operating profit was up 8.2 per cent to $237.8m.

DiData's systems integration business increased sales by 14.9 per cent and profit by an impressive 31.8 per cent.

Product sales were up 11.3 per cent and services were up 8.2 per cent. Managed and professional services grew 14.1 per cent and 14.7 per cent respectively.

About the only fly in the ointment was the Plessey business, which saw revenues fall 43.2 per cent, although there was some improvement in the second half of the year.

The Americas were the fastest growing area - sales were up 34.6 per cent. Asia was in second spot with sales up 17.6 per cent, followed by Middle East and Africa which saw sales grow 9.7 per cent. Australia increased revenues by 8.2 per cent and Europe managed 8 per cent.

Brett Dawson, CEO of DiData, said the company was on track to maintain growth rates above the market average boosted by a wider array of managed services. ®

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