The Channel logo

News

By | Kelly Fiveash 1st October 2010 12:42

Microsoft releases Windows Live apps suite

Sucks up to cloud with desktop bloatware bonus ball

Microsoft slapped a new bunch of Windows Live updates onto the interwebs yesterday in its latest effort to knit desktop and cloud computing together.

The company made a set of free apps available to allow Windows 7 customers to connect, create and share docs online.

The software updates to Windows Live Essentials 2011 include Movie Maker, Writer, Messenger, Photo Gallery and Mesh. It's been released in 48 languages and runs on Windows Vista and Windows 7, but not Windows XP.

“We’ve brought together the best of Windows with the best of the Web,” opined Microsoft Windows Live group wonk Jamie Cannon.

“People are spending more time in the cloud, and as a result it’s where people communicate, connect and share. And so, we believe that bringing them together in a seamless way allows consumers to bridge the power of both.”

He said Microsoft hoped to see every Windows 7-based PC effectively suctioned to the cloud.

And the company has signed up manufacturers to ship PCs with Windows Live Essentials 2011 pre-loaded on them, with Dell being the first computer maker to step forward and slot the software into their machines.

Like the good old days of yore, bloatware is back on Windows and in time for Christmas too. Yay. ®

comment icon Read 24 comments on this article alert Send corrections

Opinion

Chris Mellor

How long before Blue Big HQ pulls the plug on the whole thing?

Chris Mellor

Drives nails forged with Red Hat iron into VCE's coffin
Sleep Cycle iOS app screenshot

Trevor Pott

Forget big-spending globo biz: it's about the consumer... and he's desperate for a nap

Features

Windows 8.1 Update  Storeapps Taskbar
Chinese Buffet self-service
Chopping down the phone tree to scrump low-hanging fruit
An original member of the System/360 family announced in 1964, the Model 50 was the most powerful unit in the medium price range.
Big Blue's big $5bn bet adjusted, modified, reduced, back for more
Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella
Redmond needs to discover the mathematics of trust