The Channel logo

News

By | John Oates 24th March 2010 11:14

Train rebrand costs us dear

Control F?

When National Express lost the east coast rail franchise someone had to pay to rebrand the trains and website.

The total process cost £634,842 and taxpayers contributed £339,190 of this, £295,652 was picked up by National Express. The cost of repainting rolling stock was £250,000, while changing logos on the website and ticketing system cost £137,500, Rail News revealed last week.

Atos Origin charged £68,000 to rebrand the online ticketing system - changing National Express East Coast to simply East Coast. Total technology spending was £137,590 plus an extra £30,000 for the website.

Other spending revealed by the magazine's Freedom of Information requests includes £98,783 spent on offices, stations and depots and changing antimacassars in First Class at a cost of £2,576.

The Department of Transport said the exercise was as minimal as possible - for instance many signs simply had 'National Express' painted out, leaving 'East Coast'.

A spokeswoman for Atos Origin said:

Atos Origin delivered on time and to budget the programme to update the online ticketing system following the franchise change from National Express to East Coast in 2009. The programme incorporated amendments to the entire on-line retailing solution including updates to security certificates and the CRM system as well as modifying the branding and National Express specific content on all pages.

Auditing and testing of the site was also undertaken to ensure a smooth transition and no disruption or inconvenience for passengers.

The full Rail News story is here. ®

comment icon Read 51 comments on this article alert Send corrections

Opinion

Houses of Parliament in night-time

Andrew Orlowski

Come on everybody, let's upload all our stuff into Government by Cloud
Joe Tucci EMC
frustration_anger_irritation_annoyance pain

Felipe Costa

Pressure to perform for stock market bearing down on disties
Columns of coins in the cloud

Michael Cote

Anything that simple to use has got to be complex to set up

Features

Alistair Darling and Alex Salmond debate Scottish independence
You keep the call centres, Hamish, we'll take the banks
Internet of Things
Everyone loves those Things, just not on each others' terms
No email? No CRM? No Daily Mail iPad edition? You need a plan
Sinofsky's hybrid strategy looks dafter than ever