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By | Kelly Fiveash 22nd March 2010 13:03

Windows XP Mode skips virtualisation hardware requirements

All about wooing the small guy

Microsoft pushed out a software update late last week that strips away some hardware requirements for running Windows XP Mode on Windows 7 computers, in a move designed to convince more SMBs to upgrade their operating systems.

The software maker said Windows XP Mode no longer needed hardware virtualisation technology to run.

"This change makes it extremely easy for businesses to use Windows XP Mode to address any application incompatibility roadblocks they might have in migrating to Windows 7," said Microsoft's Brandon LeBlanc in a blog post.

"Windows XP Mode will of course continue to use hardware virtualisation technology such as Intel VT (Intel Virtualisation Technology) or AMD-V if available."

Microsoft released its virtual version of XP for those looking to run legacy applications after the switch to the firm's latest operating system, in October last year.

Windows XP Mode, which was first announced in April 2009, runs atop Windows 7 Professional, Windows 7 Enterprise, or Windows 7 Ultimate. At launch it required an additional gigabyte of RAM, 15GB of available disk space, and specialised virtualisation hardware that must be activated in the system BIOS.

That final part of the Windows XP Mode equation has now been dropped by MS.

LeBlanc said the company recommends the use of Microsoft Enterprise Desktop Virtualisation (MED-V) for larger organisations. ®

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