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By | Gavin Clarke 1st March 2010 18:53

Microsoft fluffs second AppFabric beta for cloud scale

Bucket-O technologies

Microsoft has released a second beta of its Windows Server AppFabric, a collection of technologies designed to improve the speed, scalability, and management of web, enterprise, and composite applications.

The company said it's looking for feedback on AppFabric ahead of planned delivery, scheduled for the third-quarter of this year.

AppFabric was announced at Microsoft's Professional Developers Conference (PDC) in November 2009, with the first sever beta also released at the show. Microsoft claimed 8,000 AppFabric downloads since November, with customers including the Associated Press, Bentley, and Jettainer.

AppFabric combines a set of application services for building and deploying Windows Communication Foundation and Windows Workflow services on servers and in the cloud using Visual Studio and version 4.0 of Microsoft's .NET Framework.

Windows Server AppFabric features hosting and in-memory caching from the previous Dublin and Velocity projects to work on Microsoft's .NET and Internet Information Services (IIS) web platforms.

The Server Fabric is designed to work with the version of AppFabric for Microsoft's Azure cloud and Windows Azure platform AppFabric. This edition features Service Bus and Access Control to co-ordinate cloud-based services and to access them, previously called .NET Services.

You can find out more and download the beta from MSDN, here. ®

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