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By | Austin Modine 15th July 2009 20:36

Ingres punts dev software bundle wrapped in Oracle fears

WAMPS to WAIPS in a single install

Open source database vendor Ingres is working hard to take advantage of any uncertainty over the fate of MySQL once Oracle gets its hands on Sun.

Oracle's acquisition has been an opportunity for Ingres to forge new alliances as well as push its product to PHP devs concerned over potential MySQL support price hikes or other unwanted changes.

Ingres' latest scheme is a new all-in-one bundle for WIndows called EasyIngres that includes the necessary kit to start running Ingres from the get-go.

Unsurprisingly, it's being promoted as a developer community project that simplifies the transition from MySQL to Ingres.

"For the first time ever, we put together all of the various components needed to write PHP applications for Ingres, and packaged it as a single installable image," stated Cédric Pasquotti, a PHP developer who spearheaded the project. "In turn, we've made it significantly easier for PHP developers to make the switch over to Ingres."

Included in the bundle are Ingres 9.2, Apache 2.2.8, PHP 5.2.9, Ingres Developer Workbench, Scite Editor Version 1.77.

The bundle is available for download here, and the project page with documentation is yonder. The company said its intentions were to provide something to EasyPHP, except running on Ingres. The current project only runs on Windows 2000, XP, and Vista, but Ingres says the next project will be on Linux. ®

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