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By | John Oates 23rd April 2009 10:38

EU circulates 'draft' Intel verdict, readies fine

Decision weeks away

The European Commission has sent a draft verdict on the Intel case to member states' competition authorities for their consideration.

The 500-page document suggests we could have an official verdict in weeks. The briefing for national authorities will be followed by meetings to debate the size of the fine Intel would pay and possibly other punishments.

The decision finds Intel guilty as charged with breaches of EU competition law, according to both Reuters and Bloomberg. National competition bodies are very unlikely to object to the Commission's decision.

In January Intel lost an appeal to the Court of First Instance asking for a delay in filing its response to the Commission's Statement of Objections.

The Commission accuses Intel of abusing its dominant position by offering rebates to computer manufacturers who promised not to use AMD chips. The case has been running for seven years since a complaint from AMD.

Last year the Commission raided Intel offices and premises used by Dixons. It is unclear if this relates to the original case against Intel or an additional investigation.

Intel declined to comment on the reports, which it described as speculation. ®

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