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By | Chris Mellor 23rd March 2009 11:46

Data Domain shows second quadcore box

Shiny new DD660

Data Domain has introduced another quadcore deduplication array, the DD660, slotting underneath the top-end DD690 and replacing the older DD580 product.

The DD690 offers up to 48TB of raw storage and has an inline deduplication throughput of 2.7TB/hour. The DD660 has a 36TB raw capacity maximum and a 2TB/hour aggregate throughput rate. The now defunct DD580 offered 31.5TB of raw capacity and a 800GB/hour throughput.

The DD660 anouncement also marks the introduction of 1TB SATA drive support which extends to the DD690. The new product has 50 per cent more basic disk capacity than the DD580 and, Data Domain says, 50 per cent better price/performance.

The range is completed with the entry-level DD510 (3.75TB raw capacity, 43.5GB/hour throughput), DD530 (7.5TB raw capacity, 540GB/hour throughput), and DD565 (23.5TB raw, 1TB/hour throughput), with a remote office DD120 product and a DDX system of several DD690s each offering local deduplication.

The DD6XX range use quadcore Xeon processors with the DD5XX range using dual-core CPUs. Data Domain recently announced a 50 per cent speed improvement via a software release. This, together with 1TB drive support, has accelerated the Data Domain product data ingestion rate and increased the amount of data that can be held on its arrays.

The base DD660 model has 12 TB of disk in a 2U rackmount chassis. It is available immediately but pricing was not announced. For now you have to work it out from the 50 per cent price/performance improvement over the DD580. ®

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