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By | Kelly Fiveash 30th January 2009 15:29

Dell quietly jacks up EMEA prices

Currency just ain't wot it used to be

Dell quietly jacked up its prices at the start of this year, but its account managers are only now filtering that information through to the computer maker’s partners and customers, The Register has learned.

The firm, which plays second fiddle only to Hewlett-Packard on worldwide computer shipments, didn't go public with its decision to raise list prices across its desktops, laptops, servers and storage commercial product range. Dell brought the price rise in on 5 January.

Dell confirmed to El Reg today that the vendor had no choice but to hike prices in the face of a strong US dollar versus the euro, sterling and other currencies in the EMEA region. However, it declined to comment on precise figures.

One Dell customer, who wishes to remain anonymous, claimed that UK prices have shot up between 15 and 20 per cent.

However, Dell - which has been undergoing a painful reorganisation by laying off 13 per cent of its workforce in recent months - insisted that “providing best value to our customers” remained a “priority”.

“We continue to monitor the currency situation closely and will of course update our pricing strategy if we see the currency situation improve,” it said. ®

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