The Channel logo

News

By | Kelly Fiveash 11th December 2008 12:58

Intel takes legal swing at Korean antitrust decision

Chipzilla insists 'biz practices are fair and lawful'

Intel is taking South Korea’s fair trade watchdog to court after it decided to fine Chipzilla for undercutting its semiconductor rivals.

The company filed a formal complaint at the Seoul High Court yesterday in an effort to overturn the Korea Fair Trade Commission’s decision.

The watchdog ordered Intel to cough up $18.6m for violating fair trade rules. The Commission ruled that Intel paid rebates to South Korean computer firms to undercut arch rival AMD.

Intel was charged by the regulator in June last year for violating antitrust laws following a two year investigation into the company’s business dealings in South Korea.

AMD has consistently argued that the rebates Intel offers are an illegal attempt to maintain and extend its monopoly.

Intel meanwhile continues to insist that the discounts aren't predatory, but rather a legit discount system that bases prices on the volume of processors a customer buys.

An Intel spokesman told the Associated Press yesterday that the firm sees the legal action as an "opportunity to demonstrate that our business practices are fair and lawful".

He added: "Our prices have always been above cost and profitable." ®

comment icon Read 1 comment on this article alert Send corrections

Opinion

Chris Mellor

Drives nails forged with Red Hat iron into VCE's coffin
Sleep Cycle iOS app screenshot

Trevor Pott

Forget big-spending globo biz: it's about the consumer... and he's desperate for a nap
Steve Bennet, ex-Symantec CEO

Chris Mellor

Enormo security firm needs to get serious about acquisitions

Features

Windows 8.1 Update  Storeapps Taskbar
Chinese Buffet self-service
Chopping down the phone tree to scrump low-hanging fruit
An original member of the System/360 family announced in 1964, the Model 50 was the most powerful unit in the medium price range.
Big Blue's big $5bn bet adjusted, modified, reduced, back for more
Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella
Redmond needs to discover the mathematics of trust