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By | John Oates 26th November 2008 12:47

Intel details objections to antitrust probe

S'not fair!

Intel says it is unable to respond to the European Commission investigation into its business practices unless the regulator gives it access to certain documents from AMD.

Intel is seeking to extend the deadline it has to respond to a month after it gets its hands on documents from AMD - the complainant in the case. Back in July Intel was handed a Statement of Objections by the Commission accusing it off giving rebates to retailers who promised not to stock computers from rival chip supplier AMD, and offering money to an Original Equipment Manufacturer to delay launching an AMD-based laptop and rebates if it switched to become an Intel-only shop.

Last month Intel went to the Court of First Instance in Luxembourg to accuse the Competition Commission of breaching proper procedure - which means the deadline is suspended.

According to the Official Journal of the European Union, Intel is claiming that the Commission decision contains errors of law and that the time limit for it to respond should only start once it has been given documents from AMD.

Intel said the Commission investigation is "the contested decisions are manifestly illegal because they permit the Commission to continue with an investigation which is discriminatory and partial".

The journal is available from this page (pdf). ®

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