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By | Gavin Clarke 14th October 2008 00:20

Next Windows name unveiled: Windows 7

Meet the new Windows - same as the old Windows

The name of the next Windows client operating system will be Windows 7.

Microsoft vice president of Windows product management Mike Nash blogged Monday Microsoft is adopting the current codename for the final product, for reasons best explained by himself.

It has something to do with not wanting to get too far away from the dream of Windows Vista. We think.

"Over the years, we have taken different approaches to naming Windows. We've used version numbers like Windows 3.11, or dates like Windows 98, or "aspirational" monikers like Windows XP or Windows Vista. And since we do not ship new versions of Windows every year, using a date did not make sense."

So much for the big Windows naming convention change 12 years back, designed to make things "clear", but OK.

"Likewise, coming up with an all-new "aspirational" name does not do justice to what we are trying to achieve, which is to stay firmly rooted in our aspirations for Windows Vista, while evolving and refining the substantial investments in platform technology in Windows Vista into the next generation of Windows."

That sounds like Microsoft doesn't want press, analysts and customers becoming obsessed with a big new name that would see Windows Vista lost in bunch of noise.

"Simply put, this is the seventh release of Windows, so therefore 'Windows 7' just makes sense," Nash said.®

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