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By | Team Register 12th September 2008 09:16

Acer raises UK prices

Mighty dollar batters pygmy pound

Acer UK is raising PC trade prices on Monday, September 15 and is blaming the dollar-sterling exchange rate for the move.

This brings it into line with HP, which confirmed yesterday that on Monday it is increasing trade prices in the "mid to high single digits" in response to the dollar rebound. In recent weeks the pound has fallen about 10 per cent to $1.75. For many months, last year, the exchange was closer to $2.00.

Acer's new prices are up 5-8 per cent, depending on the product. The increases, with additional distributor and reseller margins slapped on, will hit the end-user in October.

In a statement today, Acer said the "price change is the result of the recovery of the USD with relation to most major currencies. This change directly affects PC prices as the majority of PC components are priced in USD. We have met with each distribution partner to make them aware of this change and have worked with them on their stock profile to ensure they are in a competitive position in the channel."

In other words, get your orders in before Monday.

So that's the world's biggest PC vendor - HP - and the world's third biggest - Acer - no longer willing to absorb sterling pain. Not long now before Dell, IBM and Lenovo also raise prices. ®

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