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By | John Oates 4th September 2008 11:48

Sony recalls burning US laptops

Vaio short circuit danger

Sony is recalling 73,000* Vaio TZ-series laptops sold in the US, as a possible short circuit of wires near the hinge could burn users.

*The BBC reports 440,000 machines in the US and Japan are affected by the recall, but none in the UK.

The US Consumer Product Safety Commission is working with Sony to get the machines back. Users are advised to stop using their machines immediately and check if their laptop is one of those being recalled. The problem is caused by a loose screw in the hinge.

The models are the VGN-TZ100, TZ-200, TZ-300 and TZ-2000. Owners of such machines should go to this page which has more information and a link to check product codes and serial numbers. If your number comes up you should switch the machine off, unplug it and remove the battery.

Sony is offering a free inspection of machines and free repair if they are found to be dangerous. Sony said there are possible problems with machines sold between July 2007 and August 2008. None of the machines has yet caused a fire - Sony has received 15 reports of overheating and one customer has burnt themselves.

The CPSC announcement, which includes the 73,000 figure, is here.

Sony batteries were blamed for the last consignment of burning laptops which hit Apple and Dell. Over five million batteries were eventually recalled at a cost to Sony of some $430m. ®

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