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By | James Sherwood 5th August 2008 12:00

Micron debuts SSD duo

Consumer and enterprise models unveiled

America's last standing DRAM manufacturer, Micron Technology, has bulked out its solid-state drive range, with two large capacity models offering huge performance and power-management benefits.

The 2.5in P200 drives range in capacity from 16GB to 128GB, use single-level cell NAND technology and are meant for servers. Micron boasts that they will offer a maximum sequential write speed of 250MB per second and be 10 times faster at accessing transactional data than traditional enterprise hard disk drives.


Micron's 2.5in RealSSD C200 holds up to 256GB

The power-management benefits of the P200 according to Micron, include extremely low energy consumption - about one-tenth the power of a typical data centre hard drive, requiring only 2.5 watts in active mode and under 0.3 watts when idle. In contrast, data centre hard drives typically consume anywhere between 8 to 28 watts.

In addition, it offers a high temperature operating range of 0 to 70°C and requires "almost zero cooling".

The C200 series comes in two sizes and is intended for use in notebooks. The 1.8in drives range up to 128GB and the 2.5in drives extend to 256GB, both have a maximum write speed of 100MB per second.

Although Micron hasn’t said how much either drive will cost, the firm expects to begin mass production of both later this year.

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