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By | Austin Modine 17th June 2008 22:00

Red Hat moves JBoss to Amazon's cloud

EC2 adopts another app

Red Hat is now brewing its JBoss Java application server on Amazon's Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2), marking the company's second round of making code available as an online pay-as-you-go service.

A beta version of JBoss Enterprise Application Platform is now available on EC2. (Note: EC2 itself is in beta.) Customers can either license JBoss as a virtual image, or alternatively make existing licenses available on Amazon's utility computing service.

Red Hat is charging a fixed subscription rate of $119 per month for JBoss on EC2. Developers may also pay $1.21 per instance, per hour, with increased rates depending on the bandwidth and storage requirements.

"As the first cloud-based Java application server, this offering underscores Red Hat's position in cloud computing and advances JBoss as the leader in Java in the cloud," said Red Hat marketing director Aaron Darcy (perhaps attempting to break a record for using the word 'cloud' the most times in a single sentence).

The company began its partnership with Amazon eight months ago when it opened a beta of Red Hat Enterprise Linux on EC2. Amazon handles customer tracking and billing while it soaks in the bandwidth and storage fees it charges for using the service. In return, Red Hat gets its licensing money and doesn't have to sweat setting up infrastructure to deliver the code.

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