The Channel logo

News

By | Kelly Fiveash 9th June 2008 09:55

HP settles patent row with Acer

Buries hatchet in secret deal

Acer today confirmed that it has finally settled an ugly ongoing patent spat with Hewlett-Packard.

The Taiwan-based computer maker said in a statement: “The confidential settlement agreement resolves all claims asserted in three federal court lawsuits and two United States International Trade Commission investigations between the parties.”

HP kicked off the patent row over a year ago by suing Acer for allegedly infringing five US patents related to processor tweaks, power-consumption technology and DVD editing tools. It had hoped to block Acer from punting certain products in the US, including notebooks, desktops and media centre systems.

HP filed another lawsuit in April 2007 involving power consumption, bus operations, resolution detection, and two suits concerning temperature management in laptops and desktops.

In July last year, Acer stepped in with its own counterattack, in which it said HP had violated some of its antenna and DVD-ROM head technology.

In October 2007, Acer decided to counter-sue HP, the world’s biggest PC vendor, for alleged infringement of seven patents.

HP said yesterday it had reached a settlement agreement with Acer which means that each action between the two firms will be dismissed. ®

comment icon Read 7 comments on this article alert Send corrections

Opinion

Chris Mellor

Drives nails forged with Red Hat iron into VCE's coffin
Sleep Cycle iOS app screenshot

Trevor Pott

Forget big-spending globo biz: it's about the consumer... and he's desperate for a nap
Steve Bennet, ex-Symantec CEO

Chris Mellor

Enormo security firm needs to get serious about acquisitions

Features

Windows 8.1 Update  Storeapps Taskbar
Chinese Buffet self-service
Chopping down the phone tree to scrump low-hanging fruit
An original member of the System/360 family announced in 1964, the Model 50 was the most powerful unit in the medium price range.
Big Blue's big $5bn bet adjusted, modified, reduced, back for more
Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella
Redmond needs to discover the mathematics of trust