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By | Austin Modine 28th May 2008 18:40

VMware dollars swarm into B-hive Networks

Buys application apiarists

VMware intends to sweeten how applications run on its virtual machines with the purchase of B-hive Networks, a firm that specializes in performance management tools.

B-hive is based in San Mateo, California with its research and development center in Israel. Its flagship appliance, B-hive Conductor, monitors application performance and helps resolve problems with app response time.

VMware says it will use the technology to alert VMware infrastructure to when application performance wanes, and automatically resolve the issue by either adjusting the resources allocated to the application or by provisioning new virtual machines with additional instances of the app.

The freshly-acquired firm claims the upper hand over OS-based performance monitoring products because it can measure performance across multi-tier or service-oriented architecture applications distributed across clusters of ESX hypervisors and virtual machines.

B-hive's R&D operations will also become VMware's new base in — ahem — the land of milk and honey. Both B-hive's Israeli facility and team will form the core of VMware's new development center in Israel.

The deal is expected to close during the third quarter of 2008. VMware said the price paid for B-hive is none of your bees — no, we can't bear it — the terms were not disclosed. ®

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