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By | Kelly Fiveash 23rd May 2008 16:08

Microsoft needs Windows Home Server test dummies

'Help us root out corruption'

Microsoft is looking for Windows Home Server guinea pigs to test a public beta of a patch to a major corruption bug that has blighted the product since late last year.

The bug, which corrupts data on a number of well-known Microsoft and third-party apps when the programs are used to edit or transfer files in the firm’s latest server operating system for the low-end, home user market, first reared its ugly head in December.

In March, the software giant was forced to admit that it wouldn’t deliver a fix which affects apps that include Windows Vista Photo Gallery, Windows Live Photo Gallery, Microsoft Office Outlook 2007, Microsoft Money 2007, Intuit QuickBooks and BitTorrent client uTorrent, until June at the earliest.

Now, ahead of that planned patch release, which it has dubbed “Power Pack 1”, Redmond is looking for crazy fools volunteers to tinker with the beta.

The outcome of that test will be crucial in determining whether Microsoft is indeed ready to pump out the data corruption bug fix next month. In the meantime, it dished up to customers a classic slice of fuzzy MS speak:

“Microsoft is preparing to launch a beta of the software update in early June, and although a date for a final release remains unknown, Microsoft promises to ‘deliver a fix of the highest quality’.”

Anyone willing to have a fiddle with the public beta can find out more here. Remember, if you are planning to get your hands dirty, be sure to take a backup of the system first. ®

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