The Channel logo

News

By | Kelly Fiveash 14th May 2008 15:06

EC slaps Becta complaint on the Microsoft evidence pile

Forms 'indirect' part of anti-trust probe

The European Commission (EC) will not treat Becta’s interoperability grumbles about Microsoft as a formal complaint.

However, the Commission has confirmed it will “indirectly” look at evidence submitted by the agency as part of its ongoing investigation into anti-trust allegations against the software giant.

Becta said yesterday that it had referred its interoperability complaint and supporting evidence to the Commission. It first lodged a complaint over Microsoft’s alleged anti-competitive practices in the schools software market with the UK's Office of Fair Trading (OFT) in October last year.

An EC spokeswoman told The Register today that although Becta’s allegations would not be considered as a formal complaint, the evidence it submitted will form part of an indirect probe into Microsoft’s business practices.

“Becta lodged a complaint [against Microsoft] with the OFT regarding two aspects – one on interoperability and the other on licences,” said a Becta spokeswoman.

“The OFT concluded that the interoperability aspect should be referred to the EC, so evidence has been forwarded on," she added, "but it will not be looked at as a complaint in its own right.” ®

comment icon Read 2 comments on this article alert Send corrections

Opinion

Houses of Parliament in night-time

Andrew Orlowski

Come on everybody, let's upload all our stuff into Government by Cloud
Joe Tucci EMC
frustration_anger_irritation_annoyance pain

Felipe Costa

Pressure to perform for stock market bearing down on disties
Columns of coins in the cloud

Michael Cote

Anything that simple to use has got to be complex to set up

Features

Alistair Darling and Alex Salmond debate Scottish independence
You keep the call centres, Hamish, we'll take the banks
Internet of Things
Everyone loves those Things, just not on each others' terms
No email? No CRM? No Daily Mail iPad edition? You need a plan
Sinofsky's hybrid strategy looks dafter than ever