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By | Kelly Fiveash 13th December 2007 10:18

M&S ties up managed services deal with Computacenter

Will also handle knicker giant's WEEE issues

Computacenter Services has won a £19m managed IT contract with UK retail behemoth Marks & Spencer (M&S).

Under the deal, Computacenter will provide infrastructure and software management support for 4,000 M&S head office staff across six sites over the next five years.

The new agreement, which plumps up an existing relationship between the two firms, will see Computacenter extend its support by 10 extra service teams.

It will also take on Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) compliance duties to help M&S shift its obsolete IT kit, preventing it being dumped into landfill sites.

The massive bra, knickers, clothes, and food retailer said in a statement that the main purpose of the new contract would be to help drive down costs at the firm as well as bringing IT more closely into the bosom of its business.

Indeed, in recent months M&S has been on a heavy IT spending spree, said to be worth some £500m over the next three years, that has seen it ink deals with Logicalis and IBM.

Logicalis was handed a four-year managed services contract with the firm last month, covering network support across 591 M&S stores and regional offices in the UK.

In August, M&S gave IBM the go-ahead to bring in new in-store technology and systems, including PCMS point-of-sale application software Beanstore. ®

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