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By | Gavin Clarke 7th November 2007 01:27

Microsoft fires CIO for 'violation' of policy

Hello highway

Microsoft has fired its chief information officer (CIO) barely two years after he was appointed to the post.

Stuart Scott was cut loose following an investigation into a "violation of company policies". Microsoft is not saying anything more on the matter.

Scott joined Microsoft in July 2005, reporting to chief operating officer Kevin Turner, having spent 17 years in various roles at General Electric, culminating in CIO of different divisions.

CIO Magazine recognized Scott as one of the industry's top 100 CIOs in 2003.

Scott assumed his current role in October 2006 having shared the post with Ron Marktezich who moved on to run Microsoft's fledgling managed services business. As co-CIO, Scott had run Microsoft's internal business applications.

Scott is the second high-profile Redmond executive whose departure has raised questions. Martin Taylor, Steve Ballmer's advisor and author of Microsoft's "Get the facts" campaign against Linux, left abruptly in summer 2006 after 13 years' services for "personal matters".

Shahla Aly, Microsoft general manager and Alain Crozier, corporate vice president, will share responsibilities for the CIO's role until a replacement is found.®

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