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By | Austin Modine 20th September 2007 01:56

Dell US peddles recycling for

The Brave Little Toaster is horrified

Dell is launching a new online computer recycling program for small businesses looking to securely curb their unused electronics on the cheap.

The program charges $25 per item for up to 10 pieces of computer hardware and promises to thoroughly wipe data in the process. Dell will remove tags and labels from equipment, overwrite readable hard drives and shred inoperable disks.

When the deed is done, Dell will provide a report on how a functional system's data was cleansed and how the system was recycled. This may, however, blow a hole in your story about how unused equipment sold to the same farm where unwanted pound puppies go to frolic and play. Your IT staff will be crushed.

The company reckons the little guys are far less likely to use IT disposal services than medium- and large-sized companies, but hopes to change their ways. A recent IDC survey commissioned by Dell found that only 11 per cent of companies with less than 100 employees intend to use an IT disposal service. This compares to 65 per cent of companies with 10,000 or more employees.

Dell said it has recovered 35.6 million kilograms (that's 78 million pounds to those loyal to the avoirdupois system) of unwanted computer equipment for re-use or recycling from customers in 2006. The figure marks a 93 per cent increase over 2005. The company hopes to recover 125 million kilograms (about 275 million pounds) of unwanted equipment by 2009.

Dell's recycling efforts have satisfied the likes of Greenpeace, which today ranked the company in third place in its "Guide to Greener Electronics." Sony Ericsson and Nokia took pole positions.

Dell opens first Russian retail store

Dell also announced that in early October it will open a retail store in Moscow. The store will be located in the new Gorbuskin Dvor retail center, selling the company's notebooks, desktops, printers and other products.

"Russia's rapidly growing computer market is reflected by the 800 per cent growth in the number of internet users over the past seven years to approximately 28 million," CEO Michael Dell said in a statement. "Dell is making additional investments in its business in Russia — both products and services — to meet the growing needs of the country's IT market, which is expected to double over the next four years." ®

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