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By | Gavin Clarke 14th August 2007 19:55

Oracle names 11g Database price

Power of four

Oracle has finally unveiled pricing for its long-awaited next database running on Linux, and it's mixed news for users.

The Oracle Database 11g price will remain the same as its predecessor, 10g: expensive. Unless, of course, you want to use some of that new functionality Oracle has been promising, in which case Oracle Database 11g becomes even more expensive.

There's still no word, meanwhile, on when users can expect 11g for Windows or Unix. A company spokeswoman told The Register Tuesday "details of the Windows and Unix GA [general availability] will not be available until a later date."

The statement came as Oracle announced the price for Oracle Database 11g Enterprise, Standard and Standard One for Linux would remain unchanged, while it also introduced four add-ons that'll bump up the base price.

Enterprise Edition starts at $40,000 per CPU or $800 per named user. The company had already padded Enterprise Edition with extras, such as Real Application Clusters priced at $20,000 per CPU or $400 per named user.

Oracle's four 11g extras are: Oracle Real Application Testing, Advanced Compression, Total Recall and Active Data Guard.

Real Application Testing and Advanced Compression are priced separately at $10,000 per processor or $200 per named user, while Total Recall and Active Data Guard are each $5,000 per processor or $100 per named user.

Real Application Testing will let customers reduce the time and costs of database upgrades, Advanced Compression brings data compression two to three times greater than available in 10g and is combined with improved partitioning, Total Recall provides archiving, and Data Guard offloads backups and queries to a single physical standby database.

The updates are among 400 changes to the first major update to Oracle’s database in almost four years. Among other changes are support for new data types, improved support for XML and faster handling of Large Object Binaries (LOBs), along with improved performance - RAC grids have been juiced up by 70 per cent.®

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