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By | Gavin Clarke 26th June 2007 22:09

Microsoft finds good facts to sell Windows Vista

Driver test

Microsoft has launched a "get the facts" style campaign, only this time to push sales of Windows Vista.

The company has reportedly opened a website targeting OEMs and customers to counter reports circulating about missing driver support and a lack of third-party hardware and software working with Windows Vista.

According to APC Mag, the registration-only site promises to help OEMs and customers get the "real story" illustrating how Windows Vista is "ready today and tomorrow." [We presume that means "people ready" - ed.]

"Some customers may be waiting to adopt Windows Vista because they've heard rumors about device or application compatibility issues, or because they think they should wait for a service pack," Microsoft said in a newsletter, APC reports.

Until now, Microsoft has run "get the facts" campaigns to persuade customers to choose Windows or Microsoft applications, rather than Linux or open source, on grounds of better price, performance, TCO or security.

Whatever Microsoft says about "rumors", the facts remain that Windows Vista has come up short on third-party support. Since last November's unofficial launch of Windows Vista, Microsoft has raced to get ISVs and OEMs to certify drivers, having shipped an operating system that's unfinished by its standards.

In May Mike Nash, Windows product management corporate vice president, conceded a problem existed while also trying to downplay the issue. He attributed 80 per cent of user complaints to 4,000 drivers. Among those suffering: gamers and laptop users - with even Microsoft execs complaining Windows Vista does not support their branded laptops. ®

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