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By | John Leyden 25th April 2007 13:17

Hackers debut malware loaded USB ruse

Litter bait used as phishing lure

Malware purveyors deliberately left USB sticks loaded with a Trojan in a London car park in a bid to trick users into getting infected.

The attack was designed to propagate Trojan banking software that swiped users' login credentials from compromised machines.

Check Point regional director Nick Lowe mentioned the ruse during a presentation at the Infosec trade show on Tuesday, but declined to go into further details, citing the need for confidentiality to protect an investigation he's involved in.

Mikko Hypponen, chief research officer of security firm F-Secure, said separately that Trojan code was replacing phishing emails as the preferred method for fraudsters to rip off users' account details.

Banking Trojans are written for profit and sold through Russian language websites and elsewhere for between $2,000 and $5,000. Two of the main groups of Trojan malware authors - Corpse and SE-Code - are based in Russia and "market" the Haxdoor and Apophis strains of banking Trojans. An unknown Russian speaking virus writer group is behind Torpig, another banking Trojan family. Malicious code variants of the Bancos Trojan are sold by an unnamed group in Brazil. ®

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