The Channel logo

News

By | John Leyden 25th April 2007 13:17

Hackers debut malware loaded USB ruse

Litter bait used as phishing lure

Malware purveyors deliberately left USB sticks loaded with a Trojan in a London car park in a bid to trick users into getting infected.

The attack was designed to propagate Trojan banking software that swiped users' login credentials from compromised machines.

Check Point regional director Nick Lowe mentioned the ruse during a presentation at the Infosec trade show on Tuesday, but declined to go into further details, citing the need for confidentiality to protect an investigation he's involved in.

Mikko Hypponen, chief research officer of security firm F-Secure, said separately that Trojan code was replacing phishing emails as the preferred method for fraudsters to rip off users' account details.

Banking Trojans are written for profit and sold through Russian language websites and elsewhere for between $2,000 and $5,000. Two of the main groups of Trojan malware authors - Corpse and SE-Code - are based in Russia and "market" the Haxdoor and Apophis strains of banking Trojans. An unknown Russian speaking virus writer group is behind Torpig, another banking Trojan family. Malicious code variants of the Bancos Trojan are sold by an unnamed group in Brazil. ®

comment icon Read 3 comments on this article alert Send corrections

Opinion

Woman cuddles 'sly-looking' Fennec fox. Photo by Shutterstock
Cartoon of employee asking wky boss makes hium wear suspenders (while pincer through open trapdoor remains poised above his head) illustration by Cartoon resource for Shutterstock

Frank Jennings

It's not like my boss painstakingly nurtured the contacts, right?

Features

IBM CEO 'Ginni' Rometty
Girl and computer, photo via Shutterstock
Middle-class terror of engineering also part of problem
Nerd fail photo via Shutterstock
Shouting match
Single market vs. rest of the world