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By | Bill Ray 12th April 2007 17:59

Woman claims Geek Squader tried to film her in the shower

Not part of service plan

An engineer from Geek Squad apparently managed to leave his mobile phone in the bathroom while his customer took a shower, and would have got away with it if she hadn't spotted the handset blinking at her from the basin.

Geek Squad - Best Buy's installation and repair arm - sent an engineer to the customer's house to fix her computer. One can only assume the 22-year-old mentioned to the engineer she was planning a shower and provided the opportunity for surreptitious phone placement.

"...when I came out [of the shower] I noticed it was, like, behind the sink: the phone. And then I looked at it and there was, like, a little red dot, it was recording," she told reporters.

She called on her little sister, who cunningly removed the memory chip from the phone, and the pair took it to a Verizon store which allowed them to view the video in privacy.

The engineer allegedly offered a discount on the computer fix, in return for getting the chip back, as well he might; he was arrested and will stand trial next month.

This all happened last March, but this being America the woman and her mother have just announced that they are suing Geek Squad, and Best Buy too, alleging everything from fraud to negligent hiring and emotional distress. ®

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