The Channel logo


By | Gavin Clarke 5th April 2007 00:06

SCO tries to grok Pamela Jones (again)

Come out, come out, wherever you are

SCO Group has asked a US court to reel in the reclusive legal blogger Pamela Jones of Groklaw fame in its arcane Linux intellectual property prosecutions of Novell and IBM.

In a filing that draws heavily on press articles - including one from your very own El Reg, SCO said Jones's testimony is relevant to its case.

The attempted deposition will be seen by many as SCO's latest gambit to unmask Jones, who, it has claimed, to be in reality a group of IBM employees or an individual paid by IBM to portray SCO in an unfavorable light.

Quoting press articles, SCO's action claims IBM "funneled" between $40,000 and $50,000 into Groklaw, which tracks the minutiae of SCO's cases against Novell and IBM. Also cited as proof of bias is the fact Groklaw is hosted for free on IBM servers at

According to SCO, Jones has important information and has avoided its subpoenas by going on holiday.

In 2005, SCO CEO Darl McBride zeroed in on Jones for de-railing his SCOsource Linux licensing business. McBride claimed Groklaw put a "big damper" on SCO's claims and created a lot of misinformation.

SCO subsequently set about trying to prove that Jones and Groklaw are IBM fronts. ®

comment icon Read 4 comments on this article alert Send corrections


Frank Jennings

What do you do? Use manual typwriters or live in a Scottish croft? Our man advises
A rusty petrol pump at an abandoned gas station. Pic by Silvia B. Jakiello via shutterstock

Trevor Pott

Among other things, Active Directory needs an overhaul
Baby looks taken aback/shocked/affronted. Photo by Shutterstock

Kat Hall

Plans for 2 million FTTP connections in next four years 'not enough'
Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella


Suit-and-tie-wearing man tries to meditate, take deep breaths in faux yoga pose. Photo by Shutterstock
Emotional intelligence, not tech skills, is the way to woo suits
League of gentlemen poster - Tubbs and Edward at the local shop. Copyright BBC
One reselling man tells his tale of woe