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By | Joe Fay 18th January 2007 10:59

Big TVs and small computers turn on DSG

Computer growth lags electricals

Big screen TVs had the edge over laptop PCs when it came to picking customers’ wallets last year latest figures from PC World parent DSG International show.

Overall sales at the electronics giant were up 14 per cent to £3.8bn in the six months to November 11, with profit before tax coming in at £78.9m, down on last year’s £105.2m. While like for like sales in its electricals business were up 5 per cent, they were up 3 per cent in computing. Then again, nothing in the PC market set consumers minds aflame last year like big shiny flat screen TVs.

Sales at the PC World unit were up 6 per cent to £940.5m overall, and, again, 3 per cent on a like for like basis. It cited strong sales of laptops – something also seen at the group’s regular electronics shops – and good growth in sales of peripherals. Internet sales accounted for 7 per cent of PC World sales. During the period it opened five new stores, with two more set for the second half of the financial year. Sales at its PC City unit on the continent were up 28 per cent to £157.1m.

DSG also said it will invest £50m over the next five years in its TechGuys support service. The network operates from DSG’s PCWorld stores, but also has three standalone “clinics” with another six expected in the second half.®

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