The Channel logo


By | Tony Smith 10th January 2007 19:22

AMD moots SFF PC mobo standard

DTX launched

CES 2007 AMD is following arch-rival Intel into the PC form-factor defining game. Today, the company launched DTX, a would-be standard for quiet, low-power small form-factor systems.

DTX will take advantage of energy-efficient processors from AMD and other chip makers to provide system builders with a template for SFF PCs that consume less power and generate less noise than ATX systems, AMD said.

It pitched the power-saving element as a way of cutting production costs too - with less aggressive cooling, manufacturers will be able to incorporate cheaper cooling components. Further cost advantage will come through standardisation, AMD maintained.

Motherboard makers Asustek and MSI both gave AMD's scheme their thumbs-up. AMD said it will make the DTX specification public later this quarter, and presumably we can look forward to DTX-size mobos from those two firms in due course.

AMD's efforts mirror VIA's ongoing programme to promote its own Mini-ITX and Nano-ITX SFF PC-oriented motherboard form-factors. VIA's offerings have primarily targetted the company's own CPUs - AMD's more open approach may win DTX greater support among motherboard makers and system builders. ®

Read our complete CES 2007 coverage at Reg Hardware

alert Send corrections


Frank Jennings

What do you do? Use manual typwriters or live in a Scottish croft? Our man advises
A rusty petrol pump at an abandoned gas station. Pic by Silvia B. Jakiello via shutterstock

Trevor Pott

Among other things, Active Directory needs an overhaul
Baby looks taken aback/shocked/affronted. Photo by Shutterstock

Kat Hall

Plans for 2 million FTTP connections in next four years 'not enough'
Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella


Suit-and-tie-wearing man tries to meditate, take deep breaths in faux yoga pose. Photo by Shutterstock
Emotional intelligence, not tech skills, is the way to woo suits
League of gentlemen poster - Tubbs and Edward at the local shop. Copyright BBC
One reselling man tells his tale of woe