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By | Christopher Williams 8th November 2006 16:48

NetApp punts $160m for Topio

Duplicates EMC's de-duplication buy

NetApp has announced the acquisition of Topio, a California-based data de-duplication and protection software firm for $160m cash.

Topio software is able to create a data clone from several different storage sources within an enterprise, consolidating as it goes.

It's a buy that fits with NetApp's own recently upgraded virtual tape offering, itself aimed at providing a backup solution for businesses with legacy storage infrastructure. The two firms have been working together to flog the idea for a while.

There's an obvious disaster recovery play arising from the ability to make quick clones from many sources; NetApp marketeers will be making much of Topio's blindness to the storage source, be it EMC, HDS, IBM, or whatever. More strategically, NetApp bosses will be hoping easier backup from Topio code will encourage upgrading from rusty iron to their core business in modern fibre channel SAN hardware.

The deal follows fellow storage vendor EMC's $165m buy of its own de-duplication target Avamar last week. The motivation for the deals is similar; EMC is hoping to nudge customers into buying new disk-based backup to replace tape.

NetApp's press release on its acquisition is here.

All being well with the various interested bean counters, the deal is expected to close in December. ®

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