The Channel logo

News

By | Jan Libbenga 6th November 2006 17:38

'Carousel fraud' bank's founder held for three more months

Dutch investigations continue

Controversial Dutch mult-imillionaire businessman John Deuss, who was arrested last month after his offshore bank allegedly aided 2500 UK tax carousel fraudsters, is to be held in custody in the Netherlands for another 3 months.

Prosecutor Hendrik-Jan Biemond, who also led the case against the Ahold accounting scandal, is still investigating the fraud, which involves importing, or claiming to import, mobile phones and PC parts from another EU country without paying VAT, then selling them on and pocketing the tax.

Deuss's First Curaçao International Bank (FCIB) was shut down after raids in co-operation with Dutch authorities. The Caribbean-based bank was popular not only with British VAT fraudsters, but apparently also aided Russian and Dutch companies involved with VAT fraud, according to sources close to the investigation.

Deuss denies any wrongdoing and lawyers acting for the former oil tycoon are planning to appeal the decision to keep him detained.

In the 70s Deuss used his bank to lure the Russian state oil company into signing a deal worth hundreds of million dollars, until he stopped paying them. Years of legal wrangling followed. ®

alert Send corrections

Opinion

Chris Mellor

Drives nails forged with Red Hat iron into VCE's coffin
Sleep Cycle iOS app screenshot

Trevor Pott

Forget big-spending globo biz: it's about the consumer... and he's desperate for a nap
Steve Bennet, ex-Symantec CEO

Chris Mellor

Enormo security firm needs to get serious about acquisitions

Features

Windows 8.1 Update  Storeapps Taskbar
Chinese Buffet self-service
Chopping down the phone tree to scrump low-hanging fruit
An original member of the System/360 family announced in 1964, the Model 50 was the most powerful unit in the medium price range.
Big Blue's big $5bn bet adjusted, modified, reduced, back for more
Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella
Redmond needs to discover the mathematics of trust