The Channel logo

News

By | Drew Cullen 4th October 2006 18:51

Microsoft keelhauls customers in WGA snafu

What hope then for Vista toughness?

Some, or maybe many, Microsoft volume license customers were told on Monday and Tuesday that their PCs were running pirated software.

In a post today on the company forums, Microsoft staffer Phil Chui blamed the cock-up over Windows Genuine Advantage (WGA) validation on "an issue on the Microsoft server side".

Microsoft is investigating the cause of the server breakdown. In the meantime it offers a workaround here.

This may be less than satisfactory for sysadmins, especially if they have to hose down their, by definition many, PCs one at a time.

If volume license customers can get caught up in WGA hell, what hope for the little guys? Today, Microsoft unwrapped the Software Protection Platform, a set of tough new anti-piracy measures to be incorporated into upcoming OS releases, Vista and Windows Longhorn Server. The biggest innovation, to use a totemic word for Microsoft, will be to "force PCs identified as running counterfeit Microsoft software, into "reduced functionality mode in Windows Vista".

According to Microsoft, "in most cases customers will be able to correct this situation quickly with the options provided. With the tools in place for OEMs, and small to large customers, we expect that most customers should never be affected by having a non-genuine installation".

Hmm.

We predict tears. Lots of tears. ®

alert Send corrections

Opinion

Houses of Parliament in night-time

Andrew Orlowski

Come on everybody, let's upload all our stuff into Government by Cloud
Joe Tucci EMC
frustration_anger_irritation_annoyance pain

Felipe Costa

Pressure to perform for stock market bearing down on disties

Features

Alistair Darling and Alex Salmond debate Scottish independence
You keep the call centres, Hamish, we'll take the banks
Internet of Things
Everyone loves those Things, just not on each others' terms
No email? No CRM? No Daily Mail iPad edition? You need a plan
Sinofsky's hybrid strategy looks dafter than ever