The Channel logo


By | John Leyden 1st March 2006 14:16

AOL sues mystery phishers for $18m


AOL filed three civil lawsuits against several major phishing gangs on Tuesday as part of the ISP's wider fight against identity theft scams and other internet security threats.

The suits (overview) cite Virginia's anti-phishing statute, adopted in July 2005. AOL's suit also uses the Federal Lanham Act (trademark law), and the Federal Computer Fraud & Abuse Act.

The ISP is seeking damages of $18m against unnamed groups who targeted AOL and CompuServe members with fraudulent emails that attempted to trick them into handing over confidential personal information (such as AOL screen names, passwords, and credit card numbers) to bogus websites that mimicked the appearance and feel of official AOL or CompuServe websites. According to the lawsuits, these phishing fraudsters used "vast resources and creativity" to design hundreds of fake websites. AOL has kept tens of thousands of examples of phishing fraud emails transmitted by these gangs.

Curtis Lu, senior VP and deputy general counsel at AOL said: "At AOL, we are using every legal and technical means at our disposal to drive phishers from the AOL service, not only to protect our members, but to make the internet a better, safer place for all consumers. The phishers targeted in our lawsuits spoof a variety of prominent internet brands, including AOL."

According to the Anti-Phishing Working Group almost 50,000 phishing websites were created last year, with more than 7,000 appearing in December alone. AOL said it is committed to fighting spamming and phishing both legally and by using technologies such as its recently introduced certified mail programs. It said it blocks an average 1.5bn spam emails a day, approximately 80 per cent of the email traffic sent to users' in-boxes. AOL also blocks delivery of emails with web links to known phishing sites. Access to known phishing sites is also blocked for users of AOL Explorer browsers. The ISP partners with anti-phishing firms MarkMonitor, Cyveillance and Cyota in delivering providing protection against phishing attacks. ®

alert Send corrections


Frank Jennings

What do you do? Use manual typwriters or live in a Scottish croft? Our man advises
A rusty petrol pump at an abandoned gas station. Pic by Silvia B. Jakiello via shutterstock

Trevor Pott

Among other things, Active Directory needs an overhaul
Baby looks taken aback/shocked/affronted. Photo by Shutterstock

Kat Hall

Plans for 2 million FTTP connections in next four years 'not enough'
Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella


Suit-and-tie-wearing man tries to meditate, take deep breaths in faux yoga pose. Photo by Shutterstock
Emotional intelligence, not tech skills, is the way to woo suits
League of gentlemen poster - Tubbs and Edward at the local shop. Copyright BBC
One reselling man tells his tale of woe