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By | Tony Smith 17th February 2006 12:19

Intel trims Pentium D 950 mobo power envelope

C-1 core update to cut power draw

Intel is to add its Enhanced SpeedStep Technology (EIST) to its 65nm dual-core Pentium D 950 processor to enable the chip to operate within design guidelines for motherboards, with a maximum power consumption of 95W rather than 130W.

The change arises from Intel's decision to equip the chip with its Pentium D 9xx series C-1 core update. Late last month, it told customers it would upgrade the chip family from its current, B-1 core. As a result, the 3.2GHz 940 would run on a 95W 'mainstream' mobo rather than the originally specified 130W 'performance' boards.

Now the 3.4GHz 950 will too, Intel reveals in customer-oriented documentation seen by Reg Hardware. The 950 was always due for conversion to the C-1 core, but the chip giant has clearly looked again at its sums and found that the 950 will run in a 95W envelope after all.

Interestingly, the same documentation reveals the 2.8GHz 920 will now not gain a core update. "Intel has decided to keep the Pentium D Processor 920 on the B-1 stepping through End of Life," it says, a sign perhaps the chip isn't long for this world.

Indeed, Intel's latest desktop roadmap doesn't refer to the 920 beyond Q1 2006, squeezed out by the 3.8GHz 960 scheduled to debut next quarter. ®

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