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By | Gavin Clarke 4th November 2005 12:02

France and China share open source middleware love

It's an ObjectWeb thing

A French consortium has reached an agreement with government representatives in China to develop a middleware stack using open source software from ObjectWeb.

ObjectWeb, a Europe-based federation of open source middleware projects, and China's Orientware will build a common open source platform that integrates code from each others' projects. Work will tackle areas of common interest, including web services, workflow, transactions, Java 2 Enterprise Edition (J2EE) and grid computing.

The agreement follows a memorandum of understanding that was expected to be announced today by the French National Institute Research for Research in Computer Science and Control (INRIA) - a co-founder or ObjectWeb - and China's High-Tech Research and Development Program (HTDRP).

Projects already underway at ObjectWeb include the JOnAS open source application server, JORAM message oriented middleware, and Enhydra Java and XML application server.

News of the collaboration follows BEA's acquisition of the Kodo persistence mapping engine along with open source object/relational mapping specialist SolarMetric. That deal, announced Thursday, is intended to help expand the appeal of BEA's Java middleware to developers.®

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