The Channel logo


By | Gavin Clarke 27th October 2005 21:15

Microsoft deals out round two of executive shuffle

Don't get too comfortable

A month after radically overhauling its business and reporting structure, re-organizational spasms are still being felt through Microsoft's corporate body.

Bob Muglia was on Thursday named senior vice president of Windows server and tools, taking over from veteran Eric Rudder. Muglia, previously senior vice president of the server division, will report to Jim Allchin, co-head of the combined platform, products and services division that was created during September's reorganization.

Rudder will take a new role working directly with Microsoft's chief software architect Bill Gates, and focus on advanced development and technical strategy.

Muglia will oversee business and development for Microsoft's server and developer products. That line-up includes SQL Server, Exchange Server and Visual Studio.

These latest changes continue last month's re-organization that collapsed six divisions into three, in an attempt to streamline management ahead of greater product integration and the creation of more service-based offerings from Microsoft.

Microsoft on Thursday also announced additional changes designed to further tie its tools and the Windows developer population into this strategy. Sanjay Parthasarathy, vice president of Microsoft's developer and platform evangelism group, will report to platform, products and services division co-president Kevin Johnson.®

alert Send corrections


Frank Jennings

What do you do? Use manual typwriters or live in a Scottish croft? Our man advises
A rusty petrol pump at an abandoned gas station. Pic by Silvia B. Jakiello via shutterstock

Trevor Pott

Among other things, Active Directory needs an overhaul
Baby looks taken aback/shocked/affronted. Photo by Shutterstock

Kat Hall

Plans for 2 million FTTP connections in next four years 'not enough'
Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella


League of gentlemen poster - Tubbs and Edward at the local shop. Copyright BBC
One reselling man tells his tale of woe