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By | John Leyden 2nd September 2005 10:46 in £500k makeover

What not to web

Online retailer is revamping its website in a bid to increase the number of visitors who actually make purchases after visiting the site.

It hopes to boost its conversion rate by up to 50 per cent and increase the value of sales by improving the site's search and navigation features using technology from software developer Endeca. marketing director Jonathan Wall explained: "When we launched the website in 1999 people knew what they wanted. Now we find a large tranche of customers might know the type of product they want to buy but not which model they want. The new site is about guiding them through the process."

Following its £500,000 makeover on 12 September,'s site will display products based on their popularity rather than just a straight list. There will also be a degree of personalisation so that, for example, early adopters will be offered products other tech enthusiasts are buying. boasts 8m visits a month made up of approximately 750,000 unique users. Its catalogue contains 20,000 products with laptops, LCD monitors and external hard drives among the main sales lines at present. The average selling price of laptops is going down, squeezing retailers' already slim profit margin. "Selling electronic equipment on the web has traditionally been passive but by redesigning our site we'll be able to show customers what another extra £50 spent on a laptop will buy them," Wall said. ®

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