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By | John Oates 19th July 2005 08:44

PC sales saved by Asia, Latin America

Lower prices attract first-time buyers

PC sales showed much better growth in the second quarter of 2005 than expected, according to figures from IDC and Gartner.

IDC estimates PC sales grew 16.6 per cent in the second quarter. Gartner put the figure slightly lower at 14.8 per cent. Growth worldwide was greater than expected - back in May IDC predicted growth of 12.3 per cent. US sales grew by 11.7 per cent.

Sales were pushed by low prices for desktops and continued demand for notebooks.

Dell had a good quarter with growth of 24 per cent. IDC noted the company had a bad first quarter but made up for it with 50 per cent growth in Asia/Pacific, Latin America and worldwide notebook sales. HP managed international shipment growth of 23 per cent and kept its leading position in Europe. IDC found Apple also had a good three months with growth of 37 per cent.

IDC's worldwide quarterly PC tracker found 46.6m PCs were shipped across the world.

Gartner estimated worldwide sales of 48.9m and also credited price pressure on desktops and demand for notebooks with the growth. It saw Dell extend its worldwide lead with 17.9 per cent of the market.®

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