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By | Tony Smith 15th July 2005 09:35

BenQ ships first AMD notebook

'No, we won't... er... yes, we will'

BenQ has launched its first AMD-based notebook, although for now the product is destined only for the Taiwanese market.

The Joybook R22E-T17 ships with a Mobile Sempron 2600+ processor backed by 256MB of DDR SDRAM, a 40GB hard drive, a 15in display, DVD-ROM drive and 802.11g Wi-Fi. According to a DigiTimes report, the unit is available for TWD19,999 ($626).

The notebook's appearance contradicts comments made earlier this week by BenQ that it was not planning to produce such a machine. It was asked the question after HP announced a series of similarly priced AMD-based notebooks, seen by many local players as too keenly priced to make a profit.

AMD-based notebooks are expected to become more commonplace through the rest of the year, the report suggests, as other vendors enter this segment of the market. It cites sources who claim AMD is looking to increase its share of the Taiwanese notebook market this year from five per cent to more than nine per cent. ®

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