The Channel logo

News

By | Tony Smith 11th July 2005 08:47

Transmeta hails positive Q2 cash flow

More money going in than out

More cash flowed into Transmeta in the second quarter than it spent, the company said late last week as a teaser for its upcoming results announcement.

In May, the former chip maker said it would reduce its negative cash-flow to under $5m, and the company was quick to point out that its Q2 numbers will be better than expected.

"We have surpassed our first goal of substantially reducing our cash burn, and in fact I am now able to comfortably say that we will report positive operating cash flow for the 2005 second quarter," said Transmeta's CFO, Mark Kent, in a statement.

The company's second quarter ended 30 June.

Transmeta has been aggressively attempting to cut costs ever since it decided earlier this year to get out of the chip manufacturing business and focus instead on processor technologies it can license to other vendors. That change came to a head on 31 March, when the company restructured, a move that saw president and CEO Matthew Perry replaced by Art Swift.

For the three months to 31 March, Transmeta lost $21.1m on product sales and licensing revenue of $6.9m. ®

Related stories

Transmeta narrows loss on cost cuts
AMD steals Q1 market share from Intel
Transmeta replaces CEO amid major restructure
Transmeta to re-organise
Transmeta licences low-power tech to Sony
Once fabless, almost chipless - is Transmeta's future hopeless?

alert Send corrections

Opinion

Trevor Pott

Why aren't you, personally, stopping the moronocalypse?
Star Trek Into Darkness

Chris Mellor

Federation fissiparousness to form co-ordinated divisions
iot_internet_of_things

Chris Mellor

EMC is ahead overall with HDS mounting an IoT catch-up

Features

Lego gandalf by https://www.flickr.com/photos/isherwoodchris/  CC 2.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/ attribution sharealike
Why interconnectivity in the cloud is tougher than just stacking bricks
Handing over dollars picture via Shutterstock
Steve Ballmer. Pic:  Aanjhan Ranganathan
Nokia is the biggest write-off yet, but it wasn't the first
Confused computer keyboard
Last Christmas, I gave you my Cloud, the very next day you gave it away