The Channel logo


By | John Leyden 20th June 2005 16:48

MS EMEA chief to lead international sales push

Promotions and trebles all round

Microsoft has given its European head a promotion, putting him in charge of its international sales, marketing and services efforts as president of Microsoft International. Jean-Philippe Courtois, formerly chief executive officer of Microsoft Europe, Middle East and Africa (EMEA), will have overall responsibility for Microsoft operations in Japan, China, the Asia Pacific region, Latin America, public sector and emerging markets, as well as in EMEA.

Neil Holloway, formerly corporate vice president of sales, marketing and services for EMEA, has been named president of Microsoft EMEA, with responsibility for operations. He will continue to report to Courtois, who becomes a Microsoft SVP. Meanwhile Courtois will continue reporting to Kevin Johnson, Microsoft's group VP of worldwide sales, marketing and services.

Courtois has served as co-chair of the World Economic Forum’s Global Digital Divide Initiative Task Force and is a member of the South African International Advisory Council on Information Society and Development. ®

Related stories

Microsoft Business Solutions gets new UK head
New top dog for MS Europe's public sector
MS UK recruits FBI man
MS appoints eGovt. strategy chief

alert Send corrections


Frank Jennings

What do you do? Use manual typwriters or live in a Scottish croft? Our man advises
A rusty petrol pump at an abandoned gas station. Pic by Silvia B. Jakiello via shutterstock

Trevor Pott

Among other things, Active Directory needs an overhaul
Baby looks taken aback/shocked/affronted. Photo by Shutterstock

Kat Hall

Plans for 2 million FTTP connections in next four years 'not enough'
Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella


Suit-and-tie-wearing man tries to meditate, take deep breaths in faux yoga pose. Photo by Shutterstock
Emotional intelligence, not tech skills, is the way to woo suits
League of gentlemen poster - Tubbs and Edward at the local shop. Copyright BBC
One reselling man tells his tale of woe