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By | John Leyden 10th June 2005 09:56

10 patches - one critical - for June patch Tuesday

Make way for Microsoft Update

Microsoft plans to release 10 patches - one of which it deems critical - in a tranche of security fixes next Tuesday (14 June). Seven of the security bulletins affect Windows and there's also a single "important" update for Exchange. Two patches address "moderate" problems with Windows and Microsoft Services for UNIX in one case and Internet Security and Acceleration (ISA) Server and Small Business Server in another.

News of the upcoming patches came in an advanced bulletin notification issued Thursday which omits any details about the upcoming security fixes.

Next Tuesday will also bring with it a major revamp of Microsoft's patching tools. Consumers will be offered a one-stop destination for software patches through a new Microsoft Update service that allows customers to get updates for Office and other applications from the same place they get Windows patches. Meanwhile Windows Update will be retained and updated. ®

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